Bourgueil Is A Region in France Not A Skin Disorder !


Did you know that Cabernet Sauvignon had 2 Parents?? One was Sauvignon Blanc and The Father Was Cabernet FRANC (FRONC not FRANK). They fooled around a bit and we got the Offspring of Cabernet Sauvignon. 

It’s 90% Used As A Blending Grape

Yes,Cabernet Franc is used mostly as a blending grape in many wines. It is one of the five basic red grapes of Bordeaux especially on the Right Bank of the River like Saint-Emilion will mix Cabernet Franc with Merlots. In my Fave Wine Producing Region, Washington State, Cabernet Franc is used a lot as a blend in most Cabernet Sauvignons, Some Merlots, and of course the new term being used “American Bordeaux Blends.” California does the same. 100% Cabernet Franc exists in America. Some beauties from the North Fork Of Long Island, Washington State, Virginia, North Carolina and California. Why always blending it? The grape varietal by textbook is high in acid, very green notes like GREEN Bell Pepper, Broccoli, Tobacco, and just not for the American Palate unless you have acquired a taste for V-8 in your Red Wine like Me… Love those Reds with Veggies in there. 

The Loire Valley Of France

bourgueil_map

Bourgueil.10

Of course off to the east in Loire Valley the famous Sauvignon Blancs of Sancerre are produced and off to the west towards the Atlantic the Muscadets are produced that have that fresh smell of the ocean for a dozen Raw Oysters. In the Heart of Loire Valley for the Red Cabernet Franc we have CHINON, Saumur-Champigny (Chinon is on Fire now like Rose in New York’s Top Restaurants and a not so familiar area which I love on the Map called BOURGUEIL (I Butcher it as all American Somms do but it is BOAR-GAY–with a hardly Sound of an EL ) To me there is value to be found in Cabernet Franc if you know what you are looking for and a more pleasing American Palate for this Greenish Flavored Grape

Bourgiel

We don’t have Chinon at my Location of ABC So I took this $10.99 Bottle of 2015 Caves Des Vignerons De Saumur “Lieu-Dit Beauregard 100% Cabernet Franc, out for a Test Drive and Review. As a reminder again. all of my wines are opened one hour in advance and served and tasted at a temperature of 68 Degrees F. 

Tasting Notes And Review

Very Purple and slightly opaque on the color. This wine is grown in the part of the valley with the highest sun exposure so all the GOOD Things us Cabernet Franc Lovers like were not jump out of the glass present on this one (Which is a good thing for those who don’t want tobacco and veggies in their Red Wine) Very strong aromas of Violets and Unripe Blackberry, Raspberry and hint of Cherry with the slightest hint of the Charred Skin of a Red Bell Pepper to keep me interested in tasting. On the palate, light to medium but it is very evident that a careful use of USED Oak was used and it has a very silky and soft texture. Big Cassis and Raspberry very easy soft red fruits and finishing with a little Caramel, Vanilla, and floral finish. 

To Buy Or To Pass?

Look I am always honest. If you are looking for a Big, Bold Powerful Red this is not your wine or a Washington State type 100% Cabernet Franc, this is not your wine. The strong point of this is that although not complex or with many layers, I drank 3 glasses very easily as it has a lot of polish to it, and it falls under the category of what so many of us are looking for these days is a GREAT EVERYDAY $10 Bottle of Wine. I can see so many palates out there using this as there “come home from a hard day of work” or “open a few bottles at the family BBQ Wine”. It is a definite BUY as the Quality to Price Ratio is there. 

Try 100% Cabernet Franc and practice asking for BOURGUEIL  (at the very least it is fun to screw up the name of the region) You can’t ask for much better for a $10. bottle of French Red Wine. It is still young too as a 2015. It will even be nicer in a year or two if you haven’t already drank the whole vintage by then. 

 

Grape-fully yours, Larry

2 thoughts on “Bourgueil Is A Region in France Not A Skin Disorder !

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s